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FINAL REPORTS

REPORT DESCRIPTION


Planning for Travel Time Reliability Guide


Travel Time Reliability (TTR) has emerged as a crucial aspect to understanding the traveler’s experience; hence, monitoring and planning for reliability have become important activities for State DOTs. In addition, the Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century Act (MAP-21) emphasizes a national performance based planning process with a focus on performance measures and in particular, travel time reliability.


SHRP 2 Reliability Pilot Testing Grant Final Report


This report summarizes the work and results accomplished through the grant awarded to Florida DOT for the Reliability Data and Analysis Tools Proof of Concept Pilot Study under the fourth round of the SHRP2 Implementation Assistance Program (L38) in November 2014.


Source Book Calculations Documentation


A comprehensive introduction of the methodology used to calculate the Mobility Performance Measures (MPMs) in the 2016 version of the Source Book.


Revised HCM Methodologies for Pedestrian LOS


The 2010 Highway Capacity Manual (HCM) includes methodologies for calculating Pedestrian Level of Service (PLOS) as part of “Multimodal LOS” analysis. The HCM methodology provides scores that do not provide enough sensitivity to pedestrian improvements, and do not provide an adequate range of responses. This report describes an effort by FDOT to create an alternative model that better represents how well roadways meet the needs of pedestrians.


Bike and Pedestrian LOS Evaluation


This report compares the results of calculating bicycle and pedestrian level of service using the FDOT Quality/Level of Service (Q/LOS) Handbook Generalized Tables and the Level of Service Model, and suggests modifications to be made to the Generalized Service Volume Tables to improve accuracy.   Bicycle and pedestrian level of service measures a roadway’s fit for purpose and is scored with a letter grade of A, B, C, D, E, or F.  The highest obtainable score of “A” indicates the optimal perception by bicyclists or pedestrians, while an “F” indicates the facility is perceived as poor by users.

Bike and Pedestrian Facilities Inventory


This final report describes the work undertaken in Task Work Order 9. The primary purpose of the task was to populate the characteristics within Roadway Characteristics Inventory (RCI) for all roadways with bicycle and pedestrian facilities. RCI is a database of various physical and administrative data related to the roadway networks that are either maintained by or are of special interest to FDOT. 


FDOT Reliability Model Independent Testing Final Report

 

This final report is the result of comparison testing of the FDOT reliability model with other reliability prediction methods.

 

The main objective of this study was to conduct an independent evaluation that included an overview of the methodologies used in the model, the sensitivity of the model’s outputs to its inputs, and the accuracy of Florida DOT’s model in predicting travel time reliability performance measures. This study also compares FDOT’s model to other established TTR calculation methods, including the SHRP2 C11 and SHRP2 L07 models, and the use of INRIX field measured data.  Methodologies for calculating TTR statistics, as well as comparison of the outputs between the three models and INRIX field measured data are documented.

Trip-Oriented Mobility Monitoring Framework Development Final Report

 

This report describes a study of trip-based performance analysis.  The project team reviewed current efforts in Florida and elsewhere to undertake trip-based analysis and found that the ability to measure trips from origin to destination is lacking with currently available data. 

Travel Time Reliability as a Service Measure For Urban Freeways

The overall goal of this task was to establish a travel time reliability service m

easure for use in Florida and as a basis for including a reliability service measure in the Highway Capacity Manual (HCM).  Having a TTR service measure will be helpful in communicating performance to nontechnical audiences and for identifying deficiencies.  Because TTR is directly related to nonrecurring sources of congestion, a TTR-based service measure provides a way to measure the performance of operations-related improvements.

SIS and NHS Connector Highway Adequacy Analysis Final Report

 

The primary objective of this task was to provide FDOT with a summary of the current adequacy of the Strategic Intermodal System (SIS) and National Highway System (NHS) connector facilities in the entire state. The SIS and NHS designation type analyzed are intermodal connectors linking hubs to corridors. This analysis will provide a resource in the FDOT's performance monitoring of these key facilities. This technical report summarizes the results of the analysis of the SIS and NHS facilities.

Use of Multiple Data Sources for Monitoring Mobility Performance

 

This report provides recommendations on a data source to use for mobility performance measures and strategies for filling in missing data. It encompasses an evaluation of the feasibility of transitioning to using data and documents the plan for this transition.

Evaluation of the Draft HCM Ch 36/TTR Methodology on Florida PD&E Studies

 

This study evaluated the application of the recently adopted Highway Capacity Manual (HCM) travel time reliability estimation methods (Chapter 36) to planning, design, and engineering (PD&E) studies in Florida and made recommendations on how travel time reliability should be analyzed for substantial freeway system capacity improvements.

Express Lanes Reliability Measures Summary Report

 

The purpose of this report was to document methods, procedures, and criteria for measuring the travel time reliability and operational effectiveness of express lane facilities in Florida.  Express lanes’ performance is dependent on a number of factors, including travel time reliability, throughput, and customer satisfaction.  The effectiveness of express lanes is one part of the overall effectiveness of the entire freeway facility.

Tool for Operations Benefit/Cost (TOPS-BC) for FDOT Applications (TOPS-BC Florida Guidebook)

 

This is a guidebook describing the adaptation of the TOPS-BC tool developed by FHWA for use in Florida. The spreadsheet-based tool is used to assess the benefits of operations projects and for producing a benefit/cost (B/C) ratio for these projects.

Comparison of Performance Measure Approaches

 

The primary objective of this task work order was to compare and contrast three different performance measurement approaches: Florida DOT (FDOT), Highway Capacity Manual (HCM); and Texas A&M Transportation Institute (TTI).

SHRP2 Travel Time Reliability Analytical Product Implementation

 

 

Statewide Lane Elimination Guidance Phase I

 

The purpose of this task was to develop guidance for reviewing requests for eliminating lanes on State roadways.  Local governments (including cities and counties) and agencies such as metropolitan planning organizations (MPOs) typically request the elimination of lanes on State roads so that the recovered land can be converted to bicycle lanes, wider sidewalks, landscaping, on-street parking, or other purposes so as to promote use of non-automobile modes, contribute to more livable environments (e.g., by reducing pedestrian crossing distances and traffic speeds), and/or contribute to economic development and vitality.

 

Accessibility Performance Measures for the FDOT Source Book Technical Report

 

Statewide Lane Elimination Guidance Phase II

 

The purpose of this task was to develop guidance for reviewing requests for eliminating lanes on State roadways.  Local governments (including cities and counties) and agencies such as metropolitan planning organizations (MPOs) typically request the elimination of lanes on State roads so that the recovered land can be converted to bicycle lanes, wider sidewalks, landscaping, on-street parking, or other purposes so as to promote use of non-automobile modes, contribute to more livable environments (e.g., by reducing pedestrian crossing distances and traffic speeds), and/or contribute to economic development and vitality.